Birth Control Options

If you’re having sex that could get you or your partner pregnant and you/they do not want to get pregnant, there are a variety of options for you:

WhatHowHow muchOther
Condoms - non-hormonalBarrier to keep sperm from entering the other person’s body and fertilizing the egg.

Free at ACCKWA, SHORE, and Public Health

- available in a variety of colours, flavours, shapes, and sizes
- available in non-latex materials
- also prevents STIs
WhatHowHow muchOther
Copper IUD (Intra-Uterine Device) - non-hormonalA small T-shaped device inserted into the uterus. The copper changes the chemistry in the uterus and destroys sperm.$75- get a prescription, have it inserted by a healthcare practitioner - works for up to 5 years
- does not protect against STIs
IUS (Intra-Uterine System) Mirena, Jaydess - levonorgestrelA small T-shaped device inserted into the uterus. The hormone released causes the lining of the uterus to thin (which makes implantation of a fertilized egg difficult) and thickens the cervical mucus (which makes it more difficult for sperm to swim)$200-$500 often covered by insurance - get a prescription, have it inserted by a healthcare practitioner
- works for up to 3 or 5 years (depending on the type you choose) - does not protect against STIs
The pill - Combined (estrogen and progestin) or Progestin-onlyTaking the pill at the same time every day prevents the ovaries from releasing eggs, thickens the cervical mucus to make it more difficult for sperm to swim, and changing the lining of the uterus to make implantation more difficult.$10-$20 a month- you can set an alarm to remind you to take it
- does not protect against STIs
The patch - estrogen and progestinThe hormones secreted mainly stop the ovary from releasing an egg, but also may thicken the cervical mucus and may thin the uterine lining. Week 1: first patch
Week 2: second patch
Week 3: third patch
Week 4: no patch (period time!) The cycle then begins again with a new patch.
The ring Nuvaring - estrogen and progestinThe hormones secreted mainly stop the ovary from releasing an egg, but also may thicken the cervical mucus and may thin the uterine lining.$10-$20 a monthThe ring is worn for 3 weeks, then removed for 1 week (period time!) The cycle then begins again with a new ring for 3 weeks in, 1 week out.
The injection Depo-Provera - progestin onlyStops the ovary from releasing an egg, and thins the lining of the uterus.Each shot costs about $40 - you get a prescription
- each shot lasts about 3 months
Emergency Contraceptive Pill (ECP) plan B * not actually “birth control”If taken within 5 days of condomless vaginal/fronthole sex, it can stop the release of an egg or stop implantation of a fertilized egg$25-$35 at pharmacies 
$15 at Public Health
- the sooner you take it, the more effective it will be
- you do not need a prescription
- plan B infoline 1-888-550-6060

Some hormonal birth control options can also help you control your periods and minimize discomfort such as cramping and acne. If you have questions about birth control options, you can use our anonymous text at 519-569-9521.